Brexit: The Ayes to the Right

By Dr Richard North and cross-posted from his blog, EUReferendum.com

Possibly, the only surprise about last night’s vote was the scale of the defeat. With the noes taking 432 as against the ayes who garnered a mere 202, that put the prime minister 230 votes behind. Some of the smart money reckoned on her losing by less than a hundred.

Wasting no time at all, though, Mrs May quickly pitched in to set out her government’s position. “The House has spoken and the Government will listen”, she declared, adding with delicious understatement: “It is clear that the House does not support this deal”.

The next points she made, though, were of considerable relevance to the ongoing debate. “Tonight’s vote”, she said, “tells us nothing about what it [the House] does support; nothing about how, or even if, it intends to honour the decision the British people took in a referendum that Parliament decided to hold”.

And now we go into a predictable regime, starting with a motion of no confidence that Mr Corbyn has obligingly tabled. Thus, we can have the next instalment of the soap opera today, from which Mrs May is expected to emerge unscathed, putting the general election genie back in the bottle.

For a follow-up, the prime minister will hold meetings with her colleagues, the DUP and then “senior parliamentarians from across the House to identify what would be required to secure the backing of the House”. A “constructive spirit” will prevail but Mrs May is in no mood for playing games. Given “the urgent need to make progress”, she is only prepared to entertain ideas “that are genuinely negotiable and have sufficient support in this House”.

What precisely those might be were not stated, but if the meetings yield such ideas, we are led to expect that the Government “will then explore them with the European Union”.

Before yielding the floor, Mrs May concluded by offering two reassurances. First, she was not playing for time, attempting to “run down the clock” in order to end up with a no-deal. Secondly, addressing “the British people who voted to leave the European Union in the referendum two and a half years ago”, she expressed her belief that it was her “duty to deliver on their instruction”. That, she intended to do.

In terms of her demeanour, the prime minister did not come across as defeated. If she was “humiliated”, as some would have it, she didn’t show it. If anything, she seemed more determined and uncompromising than she had been before the vote.

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