The Steep Price of Disaster in Mexico

Rebuilding with no insurance and little government aid.

Wolf here: Don Quijones and his wife, who is from Mexico, spent part of the summer in Mexico but returned to Spain a few days before the earthquake. DQ’s in-laws live in Puebla, Mexico City, and Morelos — among the hardest hit places. They got through it unharmed and are more or less OK for now. But a lot of uncertainties remain. My thoughts are with them.

Rescue efforts in Mexico are beginning to wind down after a trepidatory (vertical) earthquake unleashed destruction and bedlam in Mexico City and the two central states of Puebla and Morelos on Tuesday. The temblor took place 32 years to the day after a horrendous quake killed at least 10,000 people in Mexico City in 1985.

Thankfully, the number of victims this time is many magnitudes lower, due largely to improved building standards and enhanced public awareness in the wake of the ’85 quake. Nonetheless, the death toll is close to 300 with thousands more injured. And for survivors the financial toll is just beginning.

Just as happened in 1985, the response of civil society to the latest disaster has been astounding. As CNN’s Mexico correspondent Susannah Rigg reports, rather than rushing away from danger in the immediate aftermath of the quake, many people ran towards it, in order to help others who may be trapped in collapsed buildings

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3 thoughts on “The Steep Price of Disaster in Mexico

    1. Let’s hope not. There have been a number of funds set up to help Mexico’s earthquake victims, but they’ve been founded by individuals who appear to be more benevolent and trustworthy than the Clinton family such as the Mexican actors Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna, and the artist, social activist and anti-GMO campaigner Francisco Toledo (to whom I plan to send a donation).

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