When The Rich Become Preppers, It’s Time To Worry

By Chris Martenson of Peak Prosperity

For over 10 years now, we’ve been openly advocating that folks take action to become more prepared should crisis arrive. And for a long time, this advice relegated us to being labeled “tin-foil hat doomsday preppers” (and other less-polite monikers). The media just couldn’t figure out any other box to put us in.

But now, the concept of taking at least some responsibility for your own future well-being by increasing your self-reliance is finally moving towards the mainstream.

Of course, government agencies have long ascribed to “situational planning” in case sudden unrest were to happen. Nations around the world have long invested in redundant supply chains, as well as well-stocked disaster ‘continuity caves’, fortresses and hardened facilities of all sorts.

It’s strikes us as puzzling that most private citizens fully expect their government to be prepared for disaster like this, yet don’t see similar wisdom in practicing a similar approach to preparation in their own life. In fact, many go so far as to denigrate and even mock their friends and neighbors who do.

Perhaps that gap between what’s considered acceptable in a public institution but not in a private home is best explained as abdication of personal responsibility. It happens a lot in our society. Live your life and let the government worry about the scary stuff. They’ll take care of us if something bad happens.

We think it’s a huge error in judgment (remember Katrina, anyone?), but we understand why it’s a convenient and comforting narrative to hold. Plus, it frees up a lot more time to shop at the big box stores and keep up on the Kardashians. Life’s more fun and stress-free…right up until some unexpected disruption occurs.

Well, we here at Peak Prosperity deeply believe in shouldering our own personal responsibility. And not just to protect our own private well-being, but also that of the communities we live in and depend on.

After all, Peak Prosperity’s mission is To create a world worth inheriting. You don’t do that simply waiting to see if the calvary is ever going to show up. You assume responsibility for your own destiny, and inspire others to do the same by offering your support and serving as a living model for others to emulate.

Those expecting/demanding the State to have high emergency preparedness while not practicing the same in their own lives lack integrity. Nobody respects a low-integrity person for very long. (Pro tip:  Don’t fly your personal jet to give a lecture on the importance of addressing climate change.)

A resilient nation is built from the bottom up, starting with resilient households. Enough of those households creates resilient neighborhoods, and those in turn lead to resilient towns and cities. And then counties, and states — you get the point.

So taking steps to be partially self-sufficient in the basics of life – food, warmth, shelter and water – and have useful experience or skills (medicine, fixing things, building, distilling, to name just a few) just makes sense. You don’t have to strive to be completely self-reliant — it’s not realistic or necessary. Just position yourself to reduce your lifestyle requirements during times of strife, and to contribute valued support to those whom in turn you ask for help.

Preparing Is Rapidly Going Mainstream

For years now, I’ve written that the highly wealthy people whom I encounter through conferences, family offices and private consultations all got the “bug out” vibe after the 2008 crash, if not before. Today, many of them are more thoroughly prepped than us regular folks can imagine.

Disaster prepping is now acceptable enough that this week’s article in The New Yorker had no trouble finding high-profile executives to talk to on record. I couldn’t help noticing that the reporter avoided inferring that these folks were crazy, or implying as much. I guess once a critical mass of super wealthy tech entrepreneurs jumps on the bandwagon it’s suddenly hip to be a prepper…

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3 thoughts on “When The Rich Become Preppers, It’s Time To Worry

  1. At the time of the Cuban missile crisis, I was a Federal Government employee working in D.C. and living in Arlington, Virginia. I was concerned for the family’s safety and we moved to Warenton, Virginia, about fifty miles to the Southwest. We had become “preppers”.

    One does not have to be rich or adopt an austere lifestyle to adopt the “move away from population centers” strategy:
    http://lenpenzo.com/blog/id22017-how-i-live-on-less-than-40000-annually-ralph-from-west-virginia.html

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Will check your blog out tomorrow or Thursday, RD. Good luck on the prepping. I, myself, am in love with the city I live in (and the city slicker I live with). Maybe one day we’ll move somewhere smaller. In the meantime, we just try to get every little bit of juice out of life we can.

      Liked by 1 person

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