Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan, “Other Banks” Ask Fed to Let them Dodge the Volcker Rule till 2022

Hidden behind the Fed’s flip-flop theatrics about raising rates.

By Wolf Richter of WOLF STREET

A decade after the first cracks of the Financial Crisis appeared – and six years since the Dodd-Frank law was enacted to prevent another Financial Crisis and to pave the way for resolving too-big-to-fail banks when they fail – Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan, and “some other banks” are still trying to delay implementation of the new rules.

These banks are asking the Fed to grant them an additional grace period of five years to comply with the so-called Volcker rule, “people familiar with the matter” told Reuters.

The Volcker rule is one of the key elements in the massive and loopholey Dodd-Frank Act that is supposed to, among other things, limit the risk-taking associated with proprietary trading, in-house hedge funds, investments in external funds, and the like. The Volcker rule attempts to get banks out of the business of blowing their own capital on huge risky bets.

Among the many loopholes are exemptions for merchant banking and foreign exchange trading. The law also allows banks to ask for a five-year extension in selling what they deem to be their “illiquid” assets that they have to sell under the Volcker rule.

The Fed already granted the banks three one-year extensions – the last one in July. So now the deadline is July 2017. These three one-year extensions, the maximum provided for in the law, were for compliance with a broader set of rules concerning selling investments in hedge funds and private equity funds. If the Fed grants this five-year extension, it would allow the banks to drag this out through July 2022, by which time everyone will have forgotten about it, mercifully

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